Articles

  1. Singapore's Economic Rebound Isn't as Good as it Seems

    Singapore's Economic Rebound Isn't as Good as it Seems
    Consumer spending has contracted for two straight quarters Singapore’s economy may be picking up, but consumers aren’t feeling it. After two years of below-par growth, economists and even the government are becoming more positive on the outlook. While it's not boom time yet, the consensus is that 2017 growth will come in higher than last year’s 2 percent. A large part of...
  2. Numbers Don't Matter in Hyperinflation - Welcome to A World of Broke Millionaires

    Numbers Don't Matter in Hyperinflation - Welcome to A World of Broke Millionaires
    For decades citizenry has been fooled to participate in a paper scam (government fiat). It’s a ticking time bomb before the majority realizes that their currency (that they expend all their energy for) is a horrible store of value. We have seen plenty of examples in the recent past where a countries currency experiences a death spiral which eventually leads to hyperinflation where the...
  3. Trump’s America Is Facing a $13 Trillion Consumer Debt Hangover

    Trump’s America Is Facing a $13 Trillion Consumer Debt Hangover
    After bingeing on credit for a half decade, U.S. consumers may finally be feeling the hangover. Americans faced with lackluster income growth have been financing more of their spending with debt instead. There are early signs that loan burdens are growing unsustainably large for borrowers with lower incomes. Household borrowings have surged to a record $12.73 trillion, and the percentage of debt that...
  4. Ultra-Low Rates Fuel Booming Business for Guarding Cash in Japan

    Ultra-Low Rates Fuel Booming Business for Guarding Cash in Japan
    The amount of notes and coins in circulation has surged Ultra-low interest rates and a love of cash have seen the amount of banknotes and coins circulating in Japan surge over the past two decades, creating big opportunities for the security companies that transport money. With a typical Japanese savings account offering 0.001 percent interest and no change on the horizon...
  5. The New Gold Rush Is All About Vaults

    The New Gold Rush Is All About Vaults
    From safety-deposit boxes in leafy west London to high-security facilities housing gold and silver in Frankfurt, companies that store valuables are expanding to meet demand. A rush into haven assets that began during the financial crisis is getting a new lease on life from an upsurge in populist politics and a quickening of inflation. Two firms say they’re planning to open...
  6. Ginza Land Prices Are Flashing a Warning Sign in Tokyo

    Ginza Land Prices Are Flashing a Warning Sign in Tokyo
    Land prices in Tokyo’s central Chuo ward, home to the famous Ginza shopping district, have jumped by 51 percent in four years. In Osaka, they are up by nearly half. Booming construction of hotels, office buildings, shopping centers and apartments, financed by record lending for real estate by Japanese banks, has driven the gains. Now some investors surveying Japan’s property...
  7. One Belt, One Road, And One Debt Hangover

    One Belt, One Road, And One Debt Hangover
    China is not only one of the world’s largest debtors, it is one of the world’s largest creditors. China uses debt not in the customary financial manner, but as a political tool to generate employment and maintain social stability. Likewise China uses loans and investment as a tool to advance its strategic interests. This may be good geopolitics in the...
  8. Brain Drain from Southeast Asia Poses Obstacle to Growth

    Brain Drain from Southeast Asia Poses Obstacle to Growth
    Highly skilled workers are pursuing better opportunities outside the region. Nyl Patangan, a nursing graduate from the Philippines, left his native land in search of a better life. Now working in a Chicago hospital after a stint in Dubai, he's supporting his parents back home and is buying his mother a Toyota Vios. A recent study by the Asian Development Bank shows...
  9. "They're Going to Have All Sorts of Issues" - Citi Urges Regulators To Address Australia's "Spectacular Housing Bubble"

    "They're Going to Have All Sorts of Issues" - Citi Urges Regulators To Address Australia's "Spectacular Housing Bubble"
    Citigroup Chief Economist Willem Buiter says Australia is experiencing “a spectacular housing bubble” that needs to be addressed with tougher regulatory measures – something we’ve noted time and time again. A shortage of housing, coupled with record-low interest rates, has made Sydney the world’s most second-most expensive property market. The city’s home prices jumped 16% in the 12 months through April, stoking record household debt...
  10. There’s a New Way to Control Inflation

    There’s a New Way to Control Inflation
    The San Francisco Fed president would let prices grow faster—sometimes. The Federal Reserve would never get a medal in archery. Since January 2012, when it publicly adopted a target of 2 percent for annual inflation, it has undershot in 59 of 63 months. John Williams, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, believes there’s a way to help the institution...

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